Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ: Aeronautical Information Service

AIC’s and AIP Supplements are published on the web-site under “Aeronautical Information”.

A Summary of NOTAM effective and pre-flight information Bulletin will be posted on the CAA web-site on a daily basis. (except for weekends and public holidays). NOTAM in force are available from the Centralised Aeronautical Information Management (AIM) service center at O R Tambo International Airport on (Tel: 0860 FLY NOW (0860 359 669). For further information see “Aeronautical Information” “Notam Summaries and PIB” on the web-site.

In the Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) which is on sale at the Publications Office of the CAA.

Fees applicable to AIP (Part 175) are placed on the CAA website under fees.

AIP Quarterly: (January, April, July and October)
AIC and AIP SUP monthly in accordance with the AIRAC dates.

The CARS can be obtained from Lexis Nexis South Africa. They can be reached on telephone (031) 268 3111 or (031) 268 3100 or by e-mail: customercare@lexisnexis.co.za

FAQ: Accidents and Incidents

It can be reported to an Air Traffic Control tower nearest to you. It can also be reported to the SACAA Accident Investigators and their cell phone numbers can be found on the SACAA's website under “Contact Details for Specific Services” that can be found on the “Contact Us” page or on the SACAA home page under “How to report an accident”.

These forms are forwarded to pilots after the accident or incident has been reported to the Investigator in charge. Accidents or incidents must be reported just after it had occurred as only an Accident Investigator can give permission to remove or recover the wreckage or aircraft, as defined on CAR Part 12. Anyone who needs an accident or incident reporting form thus have to report an occurrence.

Accident reports take anything from three months to three years to be completed, depending on the complexity of the investigation. After completion of an investigation the reports are reviewed by the Office of the Executive Manager: Accident and Incident Investigation Division (AIID) and the report is submitted to an Advisory Safety Panel (ASP) to determine the adequacy of the investigation, as well as the feasibility of the implementation of the safety recommendations in the report. Only once the ASP is satisfied, is the report submitted to the Commissioner for Civil Aviation (CCA) for consideration and action deemed necessary. On acceptance of the report by the CCA the report is released as a Final Report in respect of the relevant accident investigation.

Accident summaries are available on the SACAA website. Complete reports can be obtained by submitting a written request to the Accident Incident Investigation Division on fax (011) 545 1466 or e-mail AiidInbox@caa.co.za.

FAQ: Vacancies

Find the SACAA advertises vacancies by clicking here​.  You can also look for vacancies and in the following publications:

  • Sunday Times
  • Star Workplace
  • Bizz Community
  • African Pilot
  • Avcom
  • World Airnews

Please note that no applications or Curriculum Vitae’s will be accepted unless the applicant is responding to an advert in one of these publications and using the email address: recruitment@caa.co.za

FAQ: Airworthiness

Should you have any questions regarding the following: Aircraft Certificates of Airworthiness, Aircraft Special approvals, Aircraft Maintenance or Aircraft Maintenance Organisations please direct your questions to the Senior Manager Airworthiness at airworthiness@caa.co.za.

Should you have any questions regarding  the following: Aircraft Registration, Aircraft Certification, Defect Reporting and Manufacturing  Organisations please direct your questions to aircraftsafety@caa.co.za

Yes. Only if the aircraft is older than 15 years. This is a Trade and Industry requirement not a South African Civil Aviation Authority requirement. An application form is obtainable from the Certification Engineering Division and the applicable fee is in Part 187 of the CAR's.

Yes. Contact your maintenance organisation or the CAA's Certification Engineering Division.

If the exemption requested forms part of the CAA regulations, follow Part 11.04.01 of the CARs. (PDF).  Please note that an exemption cannot be granted from a regulation that does not exist

Please contact the Airworthiness Division.

Yes. Please follow the requirements of Part 66 in the CARs.

Please submit form CA21-15- and the prescribed fee to the Engineering Division. Contact details are available from the CAA website.

Refer to the annexures in the Civil Aviation Technical Standards (CATS) documents - Volume 3 of the Digma Aviation Legislation. Alternatively, phone the Airworthiness Division and request the particular form. All forms can be sent via email or are available from the CAA website. Contact details are available from the CAA website.

Complete a manual of procedure as well as a quality manual which may form part of your manual of procedure. All requirements pertaining to what should be in the manuals are contained in SA CATS AMO. You will also be required to submit an application form and the fee as per CAR 187.

If it is not a test flight, the aircraft owner may fly the aircraft. In the case of a test flight, a test pilot is required to perform the flight test.

Unfortunately not. The maintenance release only caters for the time for which it is made out.

Request a special flight permit from the Engineering Division. Any Airworthiness Inspector will assist with this matter. Application forms can be sent to you via e-mail or downloaded from the CAA website.

We recommend that you contact the SACAA Engineering Office by emailing your query to eng@caa.co.za or request an appointment.

​Information pertinent to the aircraft design e.g. the type of aircraft, details of engine; propeller; material envisaged for use and proposed schedule; a three-view drawing or photograph of the proposed aircraft where possible.

We will give you any guidance including any forms and information necessary to ensure you thoroughly understand the SACAA Regulations that apply to your project.

What type of approval would my aircraft be eligible for?

​A Build Number is a document issued by the Director to all construction projects of amateur-built aircraft intended to be placed on the South African Civil Aviation Register.

It applies to aircraft that are (only) intended to be constructed or assembled by natural person(s) who undertook the construction project solely for their own education, recreation and experimental purposes only.

The Build Number, as issued by the Director, signifies that the SACAA is aware of the construction of such an aircraft and it complies with the minimum requirements for amateur built aircraft as determined by the SACAA.

After registration an amateur-built aircraft/rotorcraft will further be eligible for an Authority to Fly.

Except for any other substantiation the SACAA may deem necessary in order to process the application, main documents required towards attaining a build number are:

  • A current and properly completed application form (Form CA 24-07),
  • Copy of the applicant’s identity document,
  • Design criteria/specification of the aircraft for which the build number is sought, and 
  • Proof of purchase for the kit from Kit Manufacturer of the kit intended for construction by the applicant. This is required when the applicant is not constructing the aircraft from own kit or plans.

Yes. Each aircraft issued with an Authority to Fly has operating limitations attached. The following (but not limited to) are applicable:

  • Flights may not be undertaken over built up areas and open-air assemblies of persons except for purposes of take-off and landing, 
  • The aircraft shall not be utilized for commercial or any activities to generate remuneration and so forth.
  • Private utility and owner training only.

A five phase process is undertaken to certify a manufacturing organisation, which includes the following phases:

  1. Pre-Application phase
  2. Formal Application
  3. Document Evaluation
  4. Demonstration and Inspection
  5. Certification

It really depends on the milestones specified in the schedule of events submitted by the applicant, and of course the authority will as well need equivalent amount of time to make necessary reviews and inspection. The applicant's readiness is basically the determining factor.

Anyone who holds or has an agreement with the holder of design approvals such as the following:

  • Parts manufacturing approval(PMA)
  • Part 24 Aircraft Approval
  • Type Certificate
  • Technical standard order Authorisation.

No, unless you plan to manufacturer modification or replacement parts for sale in conformance with the approved data listed on the STC.

 Application for the Part Manufacturer Approval (ZA-PMA) should be made on a prescribed form with reference to the STC and addressed to the Certification Engineering Section of the SACAA.

The holder of a manufacturing approval who desire to make changes/ amendments to the manufacturing approval, must do the following:

  • Notify the authority (Manufacturing Section) in writing about the  intentions
  • Apply for an amendment to the manufacturing approval
  • Submit Manual of Procedure amendments for approval
  • Notify the authority once you ready for the amendment audit.

A manufacturing approval is not transferrable. However a change in ownership of the holder of an approval is deemed to be a change of significance to the organisation, which constitutes the new organisation application.

The TAC process from filling in the form to issuance is detailed in the Technical Guidance Material (TGM) document available under Technical Guidance Material.

No, only the holder of the foreign Type Certificate (TC) can apply for the issuance of a TAC. This is because the TAC signifies acceptance of the foreign TC and the holder is the same organisation. The requirements for the issuing of a TAC (see Part 21 Subpart 4) can only be fulfilled by the holder of a TC, with support from the certifying authority (State of Design).

Lists of the TACs issued by the SACAA are available on the Type Acceptance Cerificates link.

The information presented in this repository is a list of TACs as conferred to current foreign TC holders, and is updated on a regular basis.

The TAC specifically lists which models from the TC/TCDS are accepted. If your model does not appear, then it was not Type Accepted, and an application for an amendment to the TAC will be required from the manufacturer in order to include models. See the TGM regarding the process for Type Accepting variants of a product.

In such cases, please contact the SACAA Certification Engineering section for advice. If the TCDS was extensively amended or the certification basis of the model was affected, then a Type Acceptance may be necessary as the SACAA will treat such aircraft as derivatives to the baseline aircraft.

The SACAA Certification Engineering section has a risk-based approach when it comes to determining the level of review to be undertaken for the issuance of a TAC. This means a large transport aircraft intended for commercial operations will be subject to more scrutiny than a small recreational aircraft during the Type Acceptance process. The determination on whether an on-site review, or a "desktop" review is appropriate, is outlined in the TGM.

Application for a TAC is made using CA 21-04 form available under clicking on the forms link.

The TAC process from filling in the form to issuance is detailed in the Technical Guidance Material (TGM) document available under Technical Guidance Material.

No, only the holder of the foreign Type Certificate (TC) can apply for the issuance of a TAC. This is because the TAC signifies acceptance of the foreign TC and the holder is the same organisation. The requirements for the issuing of a TAC (see Part 21 Subpart 4) can only be fulfilled by the holder of a TC, with support from the certifying authority (State of Design).

Lists of the TACs issued by the SACAA are available on the Type Acceptance Cerificates link.

The information presented in this repository is a list of TACs as conferred to current foreign TC holders, and is updated on a regular basis.

The TAC specifically lists which models from the TC/TCDS are accepted. If your model does not appear, then it was not Type Accepted, and an application for an amendment to the TAC will be required from the manufacturer in order to include models. See the TGM regarding the process for Type Accepting variants of a product.

In such cases, please contact the SACAA Certification Engineering section for advice. If the TCDS was extensively amended or the certification basis of the model was affected, then a Type Acceptance may be necessary as the SACAA will treat such aircraft as derivatives to the baseline aircraft.

The SACAA Certification Engineering section has a risk-based approach when it comes to determining the level of review to be undertaken for the issuance of a TAC. This means a large transport aircraft intended for commercial operations will be subject to more scrutiny than a small recreational aircraft during the Type Acceptance process. The determination on whether an on-site review, or a "desktop" review is appropriate, is outlined in the TGM.

FAQ: Examinations

This information is available on the SACAA website.

The dates, venues, schedule and confirmation that candidates are booked for outstation written examinations, are available on the SACAA website.

Forms may be obtained from the SACAA website or from the offices at Midrand. (Kindly note that all application forms must be submitted along with the proof of payment of fees.)

You will need a Student Pilot License (SPL) to appear for a Private Pilot License (PPL) examination, a PPL to appear for a Commercial Pilot License (CPL) examination and a CPL to appear for an Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL) examination.

For South African citizens you need a SA identification document (RSA ID card/book or passport). In the case of foreigners, a passport would be required.

Entries for online bookings will be on a first come first served basis. You may rewrite a failed examination only after 7 calendar days. If, however, you have failed an examination thrice in a row, or if you have failed an examination with below 50% score, then you will have to wait for 60 days before you can rewrite. (For PPL examinations, only the 7 days rule applies.) For details regarding AME examinations, please contact the SACAA Midrand Examinations Office.

All examinations are conducted on computers ( immidiate feedback).

The pass mark for all examinations is 75%.

Candidates who have passed all there examinations and need to obtain a certificate must email a request to the examination office at exams@caa.co.za. This request must be accompanied by a copy of the applicant's license. Alternatively, a request can be made over the counter at the SACAA Midrand Examinations Section. (No certificate is issued for PPL examinations.)

The 18 months' period starts from the date of the first pass of an examination for that particular license.

You need to complete the requisite application form and send it to the SACAA Midrand Examinations Office, together with a copy of your license, your coaching report and a proof of payment. You should apply for a re-mark within 30 days from result notification. You may not apply for a remark if you have scored less than 70%. The remark process can take up to 30 days.

Any such change must be done 5 working days prior to the examination. Applicant must notify the Examination Office in writing, or alternatively request a change over the counter at the Office.

All exemption queries must be forwarded to the relevant department. Please refer to the "Application for Exemptions" link on the home page of the SACAA website.

You only need to enroll for one subject. Once you have passed a subject we will start calculating the 18 months to complete the remaining subjects.

Syllabi are published on the SACAA website. Training material can be obtained from either Flying Schools or from booksellers.

Please contact the SACAA Midrand Examination Centre to confirm if the requested AME examination is available. Examinations for aeroplanes and helicopters with a MCM in excess of 5700 kg and 3175 kg respectively, cannot be written at SACAA. Candidates must attend an approved type training course.

Please refer to South African Civil Aviation Technical Standards 61.01.9, available on the SACAA website.

Please contact these sections directly at the contact details given on the SACAA website.

FAQ: Finances

It could be that the deposit slip was emailed to the wrong operational department, or the clients have not referenced the payment sensibly or have used incorrect reference protocols in terms of the SACAA website: https://www.caa.co.za/Fees%20Charges%20and%20Levies/Banking%20and%20Payment%20Information.pdf. Please ensure that your application for the relevant service is submitted to the relevant SACAA operational department together with the proof of payment.

Clients can pay at the Cashier's office at the CAA offices or fees can be paid into the CAA's bank account:

Implementation of the compulsory use of reference numbers for bank deposits made into the Civil Aviation Authority’s bank account

The South African Civil Aviation Authority is experiencing problems with unidentified bank deposits made by clients that resulted in amounts appearing on the bank statements that are not traceable and subsequently not invoiced or allocated to a client account.

Please note that our bankers will not accept any deposit (including electronic fund transfers) that is not correctly referenced according to a specified code from 5 January 2004.

The operational department will issue you with this reference code before you transfer or deposit any amount into our bank account.  Visit our Fees page to see our banking details and referencing codes.

We have also closed all other bank accounts for depositing purposes.

Yes, we accept the Amex card, but only if you present it at the cashier.

FAQ: Flight Operations

  • Amend the Operations Manual.

  • Complete the amendment application form for the issuing of an operator's certificate, as well as the statement of compliance by the responsible person. Application forms are available from the Flight Operations Department section on the SACAA website.

  • Ensure that the aircraft is only on two other AOC's.

  • Pay the application fees (as stated in Regulation I87), including the fee for the approval of a Lease Agreement if required.

  • Attach copies of all relevant required documents: Cof A, Cof R, Insurance, Lease agreements, AMO details, Release to Service and Radio licence as stipulated on the application form.

  • If required for the aircraft type, submit an MEL in duplicate for approval.  

  • If the aircraft is a new type to the Operator contact the relevant Flight Operations Line Manager.ie Part 121, Part 135  and part 127. He/she will set up a meeting to inform the client of the Five phases requirements. An established operator will join the process at Phase 3, Document verification.

The COA applies to accredited training schools (part 141) and the AOC to all other licenced commercial operators (part 121, 127, 135, etc.).

It is a list of all operators with their addresses and contact numbers and can be obtained from the Flight Operations Department at a determined fee.

  • The applicable fees must be paid at least (one month) 30 days before the expiry date.

  • An application form for the issuing of an operator's certificate must be completed and submitted together with the proof of payment 30 days prior to expiry. 
    Application forms are available from the Flight Operations Department section on the SACAA website.

After receiving the application form and the proof of payment, the inspector will phone the operator to set a date and time for the inspection. The inspector will also e-mail the check list and notification letter to the client and continue to liaise with the client by email and phone.

Please see the Air Charter guide which may be found by clicking in the Flight Operations section on the SACAA website.  The link can be found to the right of this page.

Please contact the Department of Transport.

Mrs Adreana Van der Westhuizen
Tel: 012 309 3525
Fax: 012 309 3977
E-Mail: VDWESTA@dot.gov.za

Please contact the Department of Transport.

Mrs Adreana Van der Westhuizen
Tel: 012 309 3525
Fax: 012 309 3977
E-Mail: VDWESTA@dot.gov.za

Please contact the Department of Transport.

Ms Thandi Ledwaba
ASD:Licensing and Permits
Tel No: +27 12 309 3526
Email: LedwabaT@dot.gov.za

or alternatively

Mr Andries Ntjane
Deputy Director: Licensing & Permits
Tel: 012 309 3029
Cell: 083 633 4305
Email: ntjanem@dot.gov.za

FAQ: Licensing

Yes, we do accept electronic logbooks.

Please refer to Subpart 61.11 in this regard.

To renew your license annually you will be required to forward the skills test, last 3 pages of your logbook, valid medical certificate, 12 month's logbook summary immediately preceding date of application and proof of payment.  Banking details are available on our website or on top of all our forms.  Please use your license number as reference.

You will be required to forward a formal request and a scanned copy of your foreign license and logbook pages where type was flown to enable us to verify with the country of issue.  You will have to contact your country and request them to release the information to us once we request the verification.  Proof of payment as per Subpart 183 should also accompany your application.

Please refer to Subpart 61.01.13.

Please refer to Subpart 61.01.13.

Just a normal revalidation of your license is required.

You will be required to rewrite Air Law for Private and Commercial VFR license holders and Commercial IF and Airline Transport license holders must write the Air Law and Instrument Rating (Operational Procedures).  An initial skills test to be submitted and sufficient flight training to be done by an approved ATO.

For a renewal, a 12-month logbook summary immediately preceding date of application are required and for a license issue a career summary are required.  Logbook summary example is available on Annex 1 of the Regulation.

You are not required to submit any certified or original documents.

No, your fully compliant application must be forwarded electronically to aircrewapplications@caa.co.za

No, your fully compliant application must be forwarded electronically to aircrewapplications@caa.co.za.

Unfortunately, we do not post licenses.

Exams are valid for 36 months for Private and Commercial license holders and 60 months for Airline Transport license holders.

Yes, you will be able to apply for a Commercial license although your Private Pilot license expired.

No, your Student Pilot license must be valid before you apply for your Private Pilot license

You must send an email to lv1@caa.co.za with proof of payment as per Subpart 183 if the verification letter is for yourself.  If the verification letter is requested for a foreign Authority, there is no payment involved.  If you need to be copied in on the email forwarded to the foreign Authority, you will be required to forward proof of payment.

The fees are available on the website, www.caa.co.za.

Our banking details are available on our website, www.caa.co.za, as well as on all our forms.  Please use your license number as reference when making a payment to us.

The turnaround time for licenses to be issued is 5 to 7 working days provided all requirements have been met.  If there is outstanding requirements the whole process start again once the outstanding requirements have been met.

Unfortunately, the Regulation does not make provision for that, and you will be required to comply with the requirements as per Regulation CA 61.11, www.caa.co.za.

You will be required to rewrite Air Law for Private and Commercial VFR license holders and Commercial IF and Airline Transport license holders must write the Air Law and Instrument Rating (Operational Procedures).  An initial skills test must be submitted as well.

Approval to be given by Testing Standards for exams to be written by SAAF pilots who wish to convert to a civilian license.

You will be required to forward an email to Theo Odendaal at odendaalt@caa.co.za and he will guide you in this regard.

Yes, you need prior approval to do your training overseas.  An email has to be send to our Testing Standards Department in this regard, Mr Paul Phooko, phookop@caa.co.za.

No, you will not be able to do it, but you may apply for special approval from our Testing Standards Department.

Form CA61-183 available on our website.

You may apply for approval by writing a letter with the reason why and submit it with your application, provided your test is not submitted more than 60 days late.  If the test is submitted later than this, you will be required to redo the skills test.

Yes, you may, provided you hold a valid medical.

You must forward your request with a valid medical to lextension@caa.co.za.

You must forward your request to our AvMed Department at thabeden@caa.co.za.

The Regulation does not make provision for it.

The Regulation does not make provision for it.

The Regulation does not make provision for it.

You forward a scanned copy of your ID/Passport document to haverkampam@caa.co.za for a license number to be allocated.  No Birth certificates or Driver's license will be accepted to issue a license number.  If you hold a Birth certificate you must submit an affidavit from one of your parents with your certificate.

Yes, you must forward your fully compliant application to aircrewapplications@caa.co.za.

Your license must be valid to apply for a duplicate license.  An affidavit from the South African Police Service must be submitted together with the appropriate fee as per Subpart 183 to aircrewapplications@caa.co.za.

No, you do not need prior approval as you must comply with Subpart 61.11.

You must send an email to cardlicence@caa.co.za with your license number and up to date cell phone number to enable us to activate the card on the system after which you will receive an activation email as well as a one-time pin.

You must send an email to cardlicence@caa.co.za with your license number and correction to be made.

You can send an email to collections@caa.co.za or 0115451179.

Yes, you may apply for an extension on your exams and have to contact Mr Paul Phooko, phookop@caa.co.za in this regard.

FAQ: Medical

There are 4 classes of medical examinations. The medical examination requirements differ for the different classes of medical certificates.

 

Requirement

Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

Class 4 

Includes

ALTP
Commercial pilot
Flight engineer
Flight test rating

Private pilot
Student pilot
Cabin crew 

Air traffic controller

Microlight
Glider
Gyroplane
Free balloon

Validity

ALTP < 40: 12 months
ALTP > 40: 6 months

Comm >60: 6 months

Comm <60 : 12 months but must submit 6-monthly report if suffering from a medical condition or a treatable risk factor

< 40: 24 months
> 40: 12 months

< 40: 60 months
> 40: 36 months

Stress ECG and lung function test

Initial exam
< 40: every 4 years

40-59: every 2 years

> 60: annually

Only resting at initial exam, then

first exam after 40

Then every 3 years

Chest X-ray

Initial examination, thereafter if indicated on clinical grounds

 

The frequency of examinations may also vary depending on medical conditions affecting the applicant. The aviation medical examiner can answer many of the queries regarding medicals. Further queries can be referred to the medical department of the CAA.

Applicants for Class 1, Class 2 and Class 3 licences have to be examined by a designated aviation medical examiner, which has been approved by the Commissioner for Civil Aviation. A Class 4 applicant may be examined by his general practitioner, provided that:

  • The examination is conducted in accordance with the requirements of Civil Aviation Regulations Part 67 and the corresponding technical standards (SA-CATS-MR)
  • The results are documented on the prescribed form and sent in to the Institute for Aviation Medicine for verification.

The medical examiner forwards all the medical information to the Institute of Aviation Medicine, for reviewing by medical officers. Once reviewed, the medical is endorsed as acceptable, or not endorsed if unacceptable for any reason. . All difficult cases are referred to a panel (consisting of aviation medical officers and specialists) for discussion. The decisions taken by the panel are relayed to the medical department of the CAA, and medical certificates (DD50) are issued for all cases discussed at panel. These are sent to  the medical department at the CAA, and certificates are sent out to the relevant aviators and medical examiners.

Confidentiality is maintained at all levels of these proceedings. Aviators wishing to appeal against decisions taken by the panel may apply to the Commissioner for Civil Aviation, and must also send the appeal notice to the Institute for Aviation Medicine. The Commissioner designates a panel of specialists to advise him on the adjudication of the appeal. This process may take up to 4 months to complete

Yes, you can contact an aviation medical examiner that has been approved by the Commissioner for Civil Aviation to perform medical examinations for South African pilots. A list of these approved aviation medical examiners can be found on the CAA web site. The examination has to be conducted in accordance with the requirements of Civil Aviation Regulations Part 67 (PDF) and the corresponding technical standards (SA-CATS-MR). The results have to be documented on the prescribed form and must be sent to the Institute for Aviation medicine for verification.

Alternatively, you can contact an examiner registered with other foreign civil aviation authorities to perform the relevant Authority's examination. All the results (that is all the examination forms and test results, and not only the medical certificate) have to be submitted to the CAA or the Institute for Aviation Medicine, as we need to have the medical details on our records. All the forms submitted have to be in English. The CAA or Institute for Aviation Medicine may request further additional examinations. The foreign medical examiner must hold a qualification recognised by the aviation authorities internationally and submit proof thereof to the Commissioner for Civil Aviation.

A medical certificate will be issued by the Institute for Aviation Medicine or the CAA and may be different from the certificate initially issued by the medical examiner.

You should never fly with a cold. The pressure differences at altitude affect cavities found in the skull. When ill, these cavities which are lined by membranes get inflamed and may affect the normal equilibration important at altitude. Thus you may experience severe pain in the ears or sinuses. An eardrum might even rupture! In addition, having a cold and not feeling well may have an influence on your reaction time or decision making processes.

An aviator should ground him/herself when not feeling well. The side effects of the medication can have an effect on flight safety and these effects can be worsened by altitude. One should avoid mixing various medication due to interactions that may occur that can prove fatal. One can also have allergic reactions to medication. Always consult your aviation medical examiner when you plan to take any medication before a flight.

None. The present rule is 8 hours between bottle and throttle. However, it is advisable to extend this period to 12 hours (preferably 24 hours). The maximum blood concentration allowed is 0,02 mg%. It is very important to remember that the effects of alcohol can last up to 72 hours. Therefore the blood alcohol concentration may be zero; but you can still suffer from the effects of alcohol which may have an impact on flight safety. The regulations state that you may not fly while under the influence of alcohol.

The visual examination has minimum requirements for different parameters examined depending on the class of medical applied for. You are allowed to fly with either spectacles or contact lenses. Surgical correction of refractive abnormalities is allowed but a three to six month waiting period is required before the applicant can be re-certified. The choice of the method of correction of visual abnormalities lies with the aviator and his ophthalmologist.

Yes, if it is controlled well through a proper diet and oral medication. You will be required to submit additional medical reports to confirm control of blood sugar level. Presently diabetes treated with insulin is unacceptable and renders the applicant unfit.

Yes, as per Part 67.00.7 below:

(1)  An application for the issuing of a medical certificate shall be made on the appropriate prescribed form.

(2)  An applicant who attends a medical examination or test for the issuing of a medical certificate shall—

a) produce proof of his or her identity;

b) produce for inspection any licence held for which the certificate is required and the most recent medical certificate held, if any;

c) provide the DAME with a statement of medical facts detailing personal, familial and hereditary history; and

d) sign a declaration confirming the accuracy, completeness and truthfulness of the information contained in the medical examination form.

Yes, as per Part 67.00.7 below:

(1)  An application for the issuing of a medical certificate shall be made on the appropriate prescribed form.

(2)  An applicant who attends a medical examination or test for the issuing of a medical certificate shall—

a) produce proof of his or her identity;

b) produce for inspection any licence held for which the certificate is required and the most recent medical certificate held, if any;

c) provide the DAME with a statement of medical facts detailing personal, familial and hereditary  history; and

d) sign a declaration confirming the accuracy, completeness and truthfulness of the Information contained in the medical examination form.

(3)  Subject to the provisions of regulations 67.00.3 (2) (c) and 67.00.4 (3) (b) (iii), an applicant who complies with the appropriate medical requirements and standards referred to in regulation 67.00.2 (6), shall be entitled to a medical certificate.

(4) Upon completion of the medical examination, a DAME shall complete and sign the appropriate part of the medical examination form

Yes, DAMEs are required to ensure that they upload the necessary information in line with the Technical Standards; Part 67 (Medical Protocols) requirements prior to submitting to the Medical Assessor at the SACAA.

No, DAMEs who issue medical certificates to applicants who do not meet the prescribed Technical Standards/Medical Protocols are in contravention on the law, and possible enforcement /termination may take place against the DAME.

- Issuance of Medical Certificate by the DAME to a non-compliant applicant may result in an aircraft accident and criminal charges may be laid against the DAME if they are found to have been negligent.

- The Health Professions Council of South Africa will also be informed of such misconduct. (Sipho)

No, such action is deemed to be fraudulent and the DAME will be referred to the CAA Legal Division and HPCSA for investigation and possible enforcement.

No, DAMEs have to ensure that their designation is current yearly as per Part 67 Technical Standards. DAMEs practicing without official designation are non-compliant to Part 67 and will be referred to the Legal Division for Enforcement Action

No, Class I & III Medical Certificate can only be issued by Senior DAMEs, Regular DAMEs found to issue Class I and Class III without official designation as Senior DAMEs are non-compliant to Part 67 and will be referred to the Legal Division for Enforcement Action

No, DAMEs who fail to comply with the requirement above and continue to issue aviation medical certificates in contravention of Part 67 will be referred to the vision Legal Division for Enforcement Action.

Yes, the SACAA Medical Assessors/ Nurses are required to write their name when they     verifying and communicating with DAME, this will make it easy for communication between the DAMEs and the Medical Assessors/Professional Nurses

Yes, any member of the community or DAME can submit a proposal to the Civil Aviation Regulations Committee(CARCOM),through the Legal Division of the DCA, which function as a Secretariat

No, the software does not calculate validity to month end validity dates, the DAME has to  manually adjust the system  the to the last day of month before printing the certificates.

Yes, the DAME is required to capture Near and Intermediate Vision values should be entered under comments as per Part 67 Technical Standards Requirements

These are required under Part 67, and the values have to be entered under comments.

The regulation was promulgated in May 2019 and the Cabin Crew now require a Class 4 medical. The DAME should issue a Class 4 medical certificate.

-The applicant must present the DAME with the CAA letter and certificate as evidence.

-The CAA is currently updating the Aeromedical Committee outcome on the EMPIC System.

- Where DAMEs are not sure, they are welcome to contact the CAA Medical Assessors or Professional Nurses to verify the information.

The DAME can issue a medical certificate for the duration of the outstanding period before 40 years: or

The DAME may issue a medical certificate of period of validity of 40 years and above.

- Firstly I go in at Manage Applicant, then look for the applicant, if not found create a new one.

- This is done by Applicant Form. Everything is typed in of the patient. Print and then the doctor and patient sign and doctor, scan and upload. Go to Work-list and select patient.

- At the Examination Form, everything is filled in, printed, signed, scanned and uploaded

- Go to the Examination Viewer, print certificate, if everything is correct, tick block and release to CAA.

DAMEs are advised that our regulations do not apply retrospectively unless it is specifically stated.  In this case of your ATC client, Regulation 67.00.6 provides that your client must be issued with a 24 months medical certificate but must be medically assessed first.

No: The SACAA regulations do not apply retrospectively, regulations come into effect on the date the regulation has been approved by the Minister of Transport and the Technical Standards (Medical Protocol) on the date that it has been signed by the Director of Civil Aviation. Please refer to www.caa.co.za,CAA Regulations: 2011 and Technical Standards under Personnel Licensing, Click Part 67

The visual values have still not been converted to the local values, for example 6/6=1, our office have issued the conversions to all the DAMEs for easy reference; this is still under development.

No, the system does not have  fields to enter  Stereopsis and  Phorias, this information is necessary as Part 67 and the DAME is required to enter this information under other comments

Tonometry is not required, unless if the applicant suffers from Glaucoma, in which case a comprehensive Ophthalmologist’s Report will be required.

This is a drop-down entry it can be added, currently the information can be added under comments.

No, the Haemoglobin (Hb) is currently not required by the SACAA, unless stipulated by the protocol.

Yes, the DAME must enter the Class: IV requirements under Light Aircraft Pilot Licence (LAPL), until such time that the conversion meet the SACAA requirements.

Yes, while uploading the documents such as ECG’s, Lung Functions and other, DAMEs are required to label the documents.

Aeromedical Committee information outcome will be updated by the Medical Department.

Yes, the requirements for screening are prescribed in Part 67 CATS (Alternate Requirements Audiogram and Conversation/Whisper Test) Refer to the protocol.

The Lung Function Test is required as part 67,and should be scanned and attached with the information submitted to the Medical Assesor. FEV1% is required, not the % predicted

Yes: Remotely Piloted Aircrafts are currently under Class: IV Medical Requirement, the DAME is required to clarify the category under comments

The CAA is currently working on the changes.

Additional Reports with no pre-defined labels can be placed under others.

Yes, the DAME can override the system by unchecking the Pulmonary Function requirement on ‘manage applicant’ - overview.

Yes, all DAMEs are required to implement the EMPIC System by the CAA 30th September 2017,only those DAMEs who have officially requested permission to expend for a period of time by the CAA, and once such permission has been officially granted, it can extend the implementation date.

- Yes, when the administrator/DAME confirm the appointment with the applicant the form can be e-mailed to the client to complete personal information and forward to the DAMEs Practice for pre-loading of information, this will reduce the waiting period;

- DAMEs with an extra computer can request the applicant to present themselves early, and complete their personal information and a unique password will be generated by the EMPIC System for the applicant to log into the system.

- Applicants will not be able to access the EMPIC System away from the DAMEs Practice or the CAA

DAMEs are advised to issue the old medical certificate (white/yellow/blue booklet    certificates) and not the EMPIC generated medical certificate until further notice from the Medical Department of the CAA to inform them to print on a special paper that will be issued by the CAA.

Yes, the requirements prescribed in Part 67 Technical Standards are part of the law, and applicants who do not meet the protocols/Technical Standards will be declared temporary unfit.

Yes, if the applicant is referred for further investigations, the DAME can save the information on save without check under Medical Examination Report.

Once the documents are submitted electronically, there is no need to submit a duplicate copy to the Institute of Aviation Medicine, unless informed otherwise by the SACAA.

- The EMPIC System currently does not allow DAMEs and Applicants to sign electronically.

- The SACAA is in consultation with EMPIC in Germany and currently exploring the applicable legislation and the functionality regarding the electronic signature.

-We can download the EMPIC System on a “Mac Book laptop” and the program is available on Windows Operating Systems.  
- The EMPIC System is not accessible on phones and I-Pads.

The DAME is unable to ammned this information, but can forward the query to the medical department with correct details via e-mail.

Both the Helicopter and Fixed Wing may have a Single Engine Piston.

No, however; the DAME can e-mail the Medical Assessor or DAME that they are communicating with to load the documents;

Foreign DAMEs who are designated by the SACAA have access to the EMPIC System’s electronic portal and are required to contact the CAA for technical support.

The DAME can click N/A in checkbox

Yes, the training mandatory to minimize delay relating to queries and harmonization of the implementation

The DAME must revert to the old system, ensure that the applicant sign all the necessary information, and load the information to the EMPIC System once the server is up.

The DAME should click Not Applicable(NA)

The DAME should go to Manage Applicant, and search an applicant and check if the application is blocked.

Otherwise the DAME can contact the SACAA for clarity.

Not e-mail, the DAME can forward a consultation, under examination viewer (AMC Consultation)

The CAA has increased the server resources to accommodate EMPIC.  It couls also be that the DAME's internet connection is slower.

Yes the DAME is able to capture additional information under comments if they wish to     provide clarity to the CAA.

the DAME can forward a consultation, under examination viewer (AMC Consultation)

The matter has been resolved

Some DAMEs are experiencing challenges with unstable Internet, this lies with ISP (service provider where they get internet), they sometimes get disconnected and get error messages, this normally happens when they use Wi-Fi.

It is advised that the DAME should buy internet/data from a network provider that is reliable in the area. The SACAA cannot recommend any specific products due to legislation.

The CAA notes this limitation and will engage developers

The DAME should click ‘no’ if the system ask if they want print the form, this should allow them to continue. OR  click print, when the available printers show, the click ‘Cancel’

The SACAA IT, Synova and Medical Department are available to provide continuous support.

Please refer to the EMPIC Manual, Audi Gauta training by the SACAA.

-Firstly I go in at Manage Applicant, then look for the applicant, if not found create a new one.

-This is done by Applicant Form and everything is typed in of the patient.

- Print and then DAME and patient sign and doctor scans and upload.

- Go to work list, select patient

- At the Examination Form, everything is filled in, printed, signed, scanned and uploaded;

- Go to the Examination Viewer, print certificate, if everything is correct, tick block and release to CAA.

Go to Work list / click once on applicant / choose icon #4 (change exam content) / make changes and save.

Go to work list / double click on applicant

Go to Examination report / on recommendations, choose icon #4 (request write access) / make the changes and save.

No - If an AME submit medical records for a RPAS applicant, they must please write under comments that the applicant is applying for a RPAS licence. This will make the medical certificate process easy for the applicant.

FAQ: Air Cargo Security

​As from 01 July 2009, in terms of cargo, air carriers will only be allowed to upload “known cargo”.

​“Known cargo” means a consignment to which the appropriate security controls, prescribed by Part 108, have been applied. In essence an air carrier must receive cargo from a Regulated Agent who has applied the appropriate security controls and hands the cargo over to the air carrier as “known cargo”.

​A Known Consignor means the originator of goods for carriage by air, who has an established business with a Regulated Agent on the basis of agreed security criteria as prescribed in Part 108, and who complies with the criteria prescribed in Part 108 for a Known Consignor.

​No.

Regulated Agents may accept all your shipments as known.If you are not a Known Consignor, they will have to screen 100% of your cargo

​A Known Consignor must ensure that:

  1. Known cargo is packed and secured on secure premises and protected against unlawful interference during preparation, storage and transportation.
  2. Staff that handle or have access to known cargo or known cargo documentation must undergo background checks and receive air cargo security familiarization training.
  3. Training, background checks and shipping documents shall be kept securely for at least 1 year.
  4. All business conducted must be in line with the requirements of the security manual of each Regulated Agent with whom business is conducted.
  5. Consignments of known cargo are sealed with tamper-evident seals and seals must remain intact whilst in the possession of the Known Consignor.

​If you are not a Known Consignor, the Regulated Agents have to screen 100% of your cargo.

FAQ: Dangerous Goods

  1. Annex 18
  2. Part 92 of the Civil Aviation Regulations
  3. SA-CATS-DG
  4. ICAO TI
  5. IATA Regulations
  6. The Civil Aviation Act, No 13 2009

The ICAO Technical Instructions and IATA DGR have a list of articles permitted onboard the aircraft (see provisions for passengers and crew on the CAA website).

Prior to accreditation training organisations submit their course material and manual of procedures to SACAA for review. The CAA inspectors will review the material and determine whether the course meets the minimum standards necessary to become a CAA accredited School.

The legal requirements of the International Civil Aviation Organisation's Technical Instructions and SACARS Part 92 for the safe transport of dangerous goods by air requires that initial and recurrent in-depth training must be taken by shippers and their agents, packers, freight forwarders, cargo agents, operators (or airlines), agencies handling operators and performing the cargo acceptance function.

Training is also required for staff of operators and agencies acting on behalf of operators performing the functions of ground handling, storage and loading of cargo and baggage; passenger handling and security staff responsible for screening passengers and their baggage; flight crew members and flight attendants.

The ICAO Technical Instructions and SACARS Part 92 require that recurrent training must take place within 24 months of previous training to ensure that the knowledge is current.

Provide an awareness of the general provisions of the Regulations, including the criteria of the hazard classes and the identification of dangerous goods presented as general cargo.
Cover the hazards presented by dangerous goods and safe handling and emergency procedures.
The amount of training required depends on the tasks undertaken. An indication of the training requirements is set out in subsection 1.5 of the IATA dangerous goods manual.

IATA dangerous goods manual is a field manual version of the ICAO Technical Instructions written and edited by airline dangerous goods experts, the Dangerous Goods Regulations presents the requirements for shipping dangerous goods by air in a user friendly, easy to interpret format. It also includes additional information which can assist shippers in making sure their consignments are in compliance and will be accepted quickly and easily by the airlines. Since IATA airlines are somewhat stricter in their requirements than the ICAO Technical Instructions, the DGR specifies more precisely how to prepare a shipment.

No, you have to attend recurrent training first.

The Regulations place the responsibility for correct classification of dangerous goods on the shipper. Classification criteria for each class and division of dangerous goods are stipulated in DGR Section 3. Advice on the correct classification of a substance should be sought from the manufacturer or distributor of the substance. In addition classification may be performed by an accredited testing laboratory or advice can be sought from the competent authority (The manufacturer or distributor should provide you with an MSDS).

No. It is a myth that just any cardboard box will do to meet the requirements! Under the Limited Quantity provisions the fibreboard box must meet certain specifications and be capable of specified drop and stacking tests.

​Dangerous goods training must be provided or verified upon employment, before you carry out any of the functions for which you are employed involving dangerous goods or general cargo.

​Yes, provided that the training covered the areas required by your new role and you can provide your new employer with a copy of the certificate that was issued when you were last trained.

​No. It is a legal requirement that dangerous goods training MUST be kept current. Failure to receive recurrent dangerous goods training and continuing to carry out a function involved in the processing or the carriage of cargo (whether or not it includes dangerous goods), would be a contravention of the Civil Aviation Regulations Part 92. The same rules apply to staff of operators.

​Hand sanitiser is considered a dangerous good due to its high alcohol content and must not be sent via post or undeclared. This product can only be sent via a freight forwarding company and must be declared.